“We Live in the Golden Age for Fat Fashion” – Talking with Plus-size Fashion Blogger Beck Poppins

Posted by on September 26, 2013

Every time you step up to the checkout line at the grocery store, your eyes are assailed with dozens of images and taglines from various magazines advertising how to dress your body type in the most flattering light, how to get better abs, how to achieve those enviable Michelle Obama upper arms, or maybe there is even a way to get a total head transplant ,because why not? Who cares how you feel if you look great? Women are told early on that they should find fault with their bodies. Young girls are told that they are too fat, too skinny, too freckly, too pale, and the list goes on.

Luckily, some people find fault with that line of thinking, and instead of just trying to ignore it they confront and combat it with a torrent of body positivity. Beck Poppins, a 25-year-old baker from Cleveland, Ohio, and a for-fun pop culture and fashion blogger, describes her personal fashion as “widowed fairytale princess.”

Lace, tasteful rhinestones and unusual accessories like fans, wigs and unique vintage pieces are the standout details in her wardrobe. She only owns one pair of jeans and that is a fact of which she is extremely proud. “I’ve fully embraced semiformal dresses as a life choice. My closet is split between black and pastels, with a few pops of color here or there. I always want to display myself as completely feminine and completely whimsical,” says Beck.

When looking for icons to inspire her fashion, Beck gravitates towards fashion risk takers like Debbie Harry, Dita Von Teese, and the Japanese artist Minori. Credit: Beck Poppins

When looking for icons to inspire her fashion, Beck gravitates towards fashion risk takers like Debbie Harry, Dita Von Teese, and the Japanese artist Minori. Credit: Beck Poppins

The most impressive and inspiring aspect of Beck’s style is its variability. Beck does not allow words like “flattering” to dictate what she wants to wear and as a result, her outfits are supremely successful and incredibly creative.

Beck talked with IGIGI about her style and the effects that the media can have on women’s confidence.

Jane: What advice would you give to plus-size women who are struggling to find clothes that inspire them?

Beck: As a plus-size person, these media outlets and concepts are not aimed at making you feel your best or dress in a way that makes you feel special. Look at the art and films you already love and find your personal style. Once you know what you want to look like and how you want to dress, then you can start looking for clothing. Shop with a mission: ‘I have always wanted a teal sequin dress, I shall have a teal sequin dress.’ We live in the golden age for fat fashion, believe it or not.

Jane: Do you find that there is more support or options for plus-size women online?

Beck: Online stores have opened up so many doors, and better yet, the Internet has given us sites like Etsy where you can find great artists who can custom-make things for your size.

Jane: Are you ever discouraged when you’re trying on clothes that just don’t seem to work?

Beck: Never forget clothing can change – if you find a dress and its just a bit too long, it can be hemmed, or the sleeves can be let out, or buttons replaced. Don’t let fashion boss you around or make you feel like your body should conform to it

Jane: Have you ever felt unwelcome or unsupported while shopping at a brick-and-mortar store?

Beck: I can remember one nasty sales woman at a department store. I was trying on a stack of dresses because they were having a sale on formal wear and she followed me back to the dressing room. As I was trying things on, she was yelling through the door, ‘Don’t force any zippers if it doesn’t fit! Don’t stretch anything out! If it’s too small just leave it on the hanger!’ Just all this weird, misplaced negativity that she would have never yelled at a thin costumer. I don’t let that stuff get me down anymore. Now I shop exclusively at stores that treat me with complete dignity and I would suggest to anyone who has suffered discrimination at a store, never go back, never give them a penny, and always write to the store’s owners. Never let that nasty rude behavior slide.

Beck unapologetically loves her body at all times, even in "gross sweatpants," because as important and fun as fashion can be, self-love is important always, even when you look your worst. Credit: Beck Poppins

Beck unapologetically loves her body at all times, even in “gross sweatpants,” because as important and fun as fashion can be, self-love is important always, even when you look your worst. Credit: Beck Poppins

Stores and designers that specifically cater to plus-size women, like IGIGI, provide a more supportive and helpful customer service experience overall, with absolutely no body-shaming allowed. Beck recommends the beaded IGIGI Keira dress for those who are looking to copy her fabulous look. “It has two of my favorite things, a deep square neckline and three-quarter sleeves! The beading looks amazing,” says Beck. “It’s also so hard for tall women to find evening dresses in a length that goes past the knee. I feel like it would be a beautiful dress to go to the theater in. I personally would love to see it with a little brass tiara or gold laurel inspired headband, long black evening gloves, black tights and some gold trimmed heels, really play up the wicked queen fantasy that the beading on the skirt inspires.”

Thank you Beck for taking the time to talk with IGIGI and to keep up with Beck or talk to her yourself, make sure to follow her on Tumblr and Twitter.

Have you ever been dissatisfied with your experience in a store? Tell IGIGI and Beck in the comments.

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