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Top 6 Reasons To Fall In Love With Autumn Accessories

Posted by on October 4, 2015

Can you feel it? Leaves are changing, the air is cooling and sweater weather is back. Autumn is here, and so are the rich burgundy, caramel, chocolate and navy colored accessories in store windows.

This September, IGIGI launched it’s own line of affordable handbags. Check out our blog post below from fashion publicist and social media girl Camille Schmidt on her favorite fall accessories from IGIGI and notable designers.
Top 6 Autumn Accessories to Jumpstart Autumn
IGIGI Carla Handbag

The Carla Shoulder bag is a perfect small bag for running errands while still looking fashionable. Pair this shoulder bag with an all black outfit and dark shades and watch the burgundy bag pop.
eugenia-kim-mink-honey-wide-brim-hat-product-1-854974759-normal The Eugenia Kim “Honey Hat” is a versatile wide brimmed hat perfect for evoking a bohemian babe feel. This hat has been worn by starlets including Sienna Miller, Kim Kardashian and Blake Lively. Pair this hat with the Hayleigh Dress in Midnight Blue and look like perfection for an outdoor concert in the park.
obi-belt-caramel-finalThis faux suede Obi belt is the perfect addition to make any summer outfit, a fall look. Just wrap and go! Pair this obi with a dress like the Fiona dress to accentuate your waist line.
Naturalizer Jamison Wide Shaft Boots
These warm brown riding boots are perfect with a sweater and a maxi skirt or paired with leggings and cocoon coat.  Did we mention they’re wide leg? Now you can look like an equestrian and have a comfy go-to boot for fall.
bag-4-f-cleaned2This camel tote is the perfect work to weekend bag. Large enough to carry a notebook or tablet this elegant faux-leather floral bag is an elegant addition to a wrap dress like the Dominique Dress in Black  for work, on weekends pair the Lattice Tote with a floppy brim hat like the Eugenia Kim “Honey Hat” and a maxi dress like the with for a boho feel.
Tom-Ford-Womens-FT0296-Josephine-01B-Shiny-Black-Sunglasses-e01509bb-e04f-438f-8516-0f5f4429640a_600These black sunnies are perfect for hiding your eyes and grabbing a pumpkin spice latte after staying up late drinking single malt whiskey and feasting on candy corn.

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Striking a Balance

Posted by on September 18, 2015

As I’ve been getting acclimated to NYC, I’ve been thinking a lot about what it means to be “balanced” and healthy. Even when it comes to how much one should consume and eat, it depends on the person. What is more personal than someone’s appetite? Is it better to eat something mediocre and stuffed with GMOs than to skip a meal and eat some lean vegetables later?

Managing your own life can be hard, perhaps since we expect so much from it. Since we’re limited on time and live on sacrifices where it seems like the responsibilities and tasks we’re assigned diminish each other (e.g. productivity versus rest), the whole task of balance seems futile and meaningful at once.

I recently participated in an amazing yoga event in Central Park hosted by Lole White. 10,000 other yogis and I, clad in yellow, stretched our bodies together in unison. I lie. I actually went in my work skirt (one of the workers came up to me to tell me that she loved that I was doing yoga in my “real clothes”). It was amazing to do yoga and feel the uneven grass beneath my mat. I had chosen to be there even though my day had been difficult. The illusion of choice brought me peace.

Life is like a house, a wise friend of mine once said. You pay too much attention to one room and you forget the details of the whole house or neglect another room, or the basement downstairs that needs a deep cleaning. I suppose being balanced is being mindful of both the forest and the trees.

How do you find your balance?

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Nail Polish for Your Labor of Love

Posted by on September 9, 2015

Labor Day weekend has passed but I know that some of you labored–err, worked–over the extended weekend. I was thinking the other day about the beauty of hands. It’s the little details in people that I enjoy noticing, like the protrusion of someone’s elbow, the fragility of wrists, and the curvature of hands that naturally open up like a plea when they’re most relaxed. I think of hands as sacred, the elevated sibling to our feet (we were four-legged creatures at one point).

It’s hard for me to put my hands to rest, as I’m constantly restless. I want to knit, read, fiddle–anything. My hands are an extension of my brain. I find a lot of meaning through the domesticity of my hands, whether I’m washing dishes or picking cherries from the market. 

One guilty pleasure I have is nail polish since it’s even nicer to look at your hands and see color on the fingertips as you go about your day typing on the computer, opening the door, folding your clothes. Nail polish occupies a non-discriminatory land in fashion: it’s fun, colorful, affordable, and temporary. It is completely inclusive in sheer practicality and attainability. As much as I’m not a prissy girl who gets her nails done at the salon, I love having a cute bottle of nail polish to spice up my outfit.
I discovered a great website devoted to the love of nail polish. It’s called Live.Love.Polish and they have a variety of colors to choose from. The biggest perk on browsing through their website is that they show how the nail polish color really looks with the fingernails fanned out in a primally pleasurable way. The pictures invite caress. I selected my favorite colors and kits to try for the remaining of summer. Summer’s not over yet, guys. Treat yourself and show your hands some love.
Can anything else scream more fun than Starrily’s Gumball nail polish? Looking at this color batch makes me want to blow bubble gum, eat cotton candy, and go straight for the fair.
Nail art is a trend and this time you can manually make your own dots with Picture Polish’s dotticure kit. Time to go dotty!
Ever feel like Picasso but just don’t care beyond your nails? This kit has everything you need to marble your own fingernails.
This one is called “Donut Ever Let Me Go” which makes my heart melt for some donuts in my belly… and that confetti sprinkle that makes me think of a summer birthday picnic.

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We Wear Our Clothes In Order To Tell A Story

Posted by on August 29, 2015

What is your story?


“We are always asking for something when we get dressed. Asking to be loved, . . . to be admired, to be left alone, to make people laugh, to scare people, to look wealthy, to say I’m poor, I love myself.”–interviewee.

My friend tipped me off to a thoughtful, multimedia book called Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, which could also be titled We Wear Our Clothes In Order To Tell A Story. It’s pretty thick so I’m taking my time reading it. I love learning about the intimate history of my friends’ wardrobes and how the act of dressing is their way of becoming into character. Women in Clothes reads loosely as a melange of confessional stories from a diverse pool of women on the discourse of clothing and identity but is also very “meta”: there are also transcripts of loopy Skype conversations as the editors discuss how they want the book to turn out just as we try to assemble ourselves everyday for self-presentation. You’ll even read interviews with Lena Dunham, Kim Gordon from Sonic Youth, Molly Ringwald, and many other women. As much as I enjoyed reading others’ experiences, I was particular drawn to the survey at the very beginning of the book which covered every question I could have of fashion possible. Apparently 639 women responded to this survey but their website also has an ongoing survey where women can still post their answers to their favorite questions. I’m posting the full survey here of the 50+ questions as a jumpstart to see what IGIGI women have to say on their own personal stories with clothing. Please share your story! We would love to learn more about you.


* What is the most transformative conversation you have ever had with someone on the subject of fashion or style?

* With whom do you talk about clothes?

* Do you think you have taste or style? Which one is more important? What do these words mean to you?
* Do you have style in any areas of your life aside from fashion?
* Do you have a unified way of approaching your life, work, relationships, finances, chores, etc.? Please explain.
* Would you say you “know what you like” in the area of fashion and clothing? If so, do you also know what you like in other areas of life, that is, are you generally good at discernment? What would you say you like in other areas of life, that is, are you generally good at discernment? If you’re not so sure about your clothing choices, would you say you’re better in other areas, or the same? Can you say where your discernment comes from, if you have it (or where the lack comes from, if you don’t have it), and why?
* Can you say a bit about how your mother’s body and style have been passed down to you or not?
* What is your cultural background, and how has that influenced how you dress?
* Did your parents teach you about clothing, care for your clothing, dressing, or style? What lessons do you remember? Did they tell you things directly, or did you just pick things up?
* What sorts of things do you do, clothing-or make-up or hair-wise, to feel sexy or alluring?
* What are some of the things you admire about how other women present themselves?
* Many people say they want to feel “comfortable,” or that they admire people who seem “confident.” What do these words really mean to you?
* Do you care about lingerie?
* Do you notice women on the street? If so, what sort of women do you tend to notice? What sort do you tend to admire? If not admiration, what is the feeling that a compelling woman on the street gives you?
* If dressing were the only thing you did, and you were considered an expert and asked to explain your style philosophy, what would you say?
* What is really beautiful, for you, in general?
* What do you consider very ugly?
* Are you generally a good judge of whether what you buy will end up being worn? Have you figured out how to know in advance?
* When you look at yourself before going out, and you are trying to see yourself from the outside, what is this “other person” like? What does she like, dislike, what sorts of judgments does she have? Is this “outer eye” based on someone you know or knew once?
* What’s your process getting dressed in the morning? What are you considering?
* What are you trying to achieve when you dress?
* What, for you, is the difference between dressing and dressing up?
* If you had to wear a “uniform,” what would it look like?
* What would you say is “you,” and what would you say is “not you”?
* Do you remember a time in your life when you dressed quite differently from how you do now? Can you describe it and what it was all about for you?
* What sorts of things do you do, clothing-, make-up, or hair-wise, to feel professional?
* How do you conform to or rebel against the dress expectations at your workplace?
* How do institutions affect the way you dress?
* Do you have a dress code, a school uniform, or a uniform that you wear for an extracurricular activity?
* Are there ways in which you conform to or rebel against these uniforms?
* Is it comforting or constraining to have a uniform?
* Was there a moment in your life when something “clicked” for you about fashion or dressing or makeup or hair? What was it? Why did it happen then, do you think?
* Are there any dressing tricks you’ve invented or learned that make you feel like you’re getting away with something?
* What are some dressing rules that you wouldn’t necessarily recommend to others but that you follow?
* Are there any dressing rules you’d want to convey to other women?
* What is an archetypal outfit for you, one that you could have happily worn at any point in your life? What do you like about it?
* Do you ever wish you were a man or could dress like a man or had a man’s body? Was there ever a time in the past?
* If there was one country or culture or era that you had to live in, fashion-wise, what would it be?
* Do you consider yourself photogenic?
* When you see yourself in photographs, what do you think?
* Send a photograph of your mother from the time before she had children, and tell us what you see.
* Are there any figures from culture, past or present, whose style you admire or have drawn from?
* Have you ever had a dream that involved clothes?
* What would be a difficult or uncomfortable look for you to try to achieve?
* Have you stolen, borrowed, or adapted any dressing ideas or actual items from friends or family?
* Have you ever successfully given someone a present or jewelry or clothing that you continue to feel good about?
* Were you ever given a present or clothing or jewelry that especially touched you?
* If you were totally comfortable with your body, or your body were a bit closer to what you wish it was like, what would you wear?
* When do you feel at your most attractive?
* Is there anyone you are trying to attract or repel when you dress?
* Do you like to smell a certain way?
* What do you think of perfume? Do you wear it?
* What’s the situation with your hair?
* Please describe your body.
* Please describe your mind.
* Please describe your emotions.
* What are some things you need to do to your body or clothes in order to feel presentable?
* How does makeup fit into all this for you?
* What are you wearing on your body and face, and how is your hair done, right at this moment?
* Is there a certain look you feel you’re expected to like that you have absolutely no interest in? What is it? Why aren’t you interested?
* What are your closet and drawers like? Do you keep things neat, etc.?
* Can you describe in a basic way what you own, clothing- and jewelry-wise?
* What is your favorite piece of clothing or jewelry that you own?
* Tell us about something in your closet that you keep but never wear. What is it, why don’t you wear it, and why do you keep it?
* Is there any fashion trend you’ve refused to participate in, and if so, why?
* Looking back at your purchases over the past five to fifteen years, can you generalize about what sorts of things were the most valuable to buy?
* Is there an item of clothing that you once owned but no longer own and still think about or wish you had? What was it and what happened to it and why do you want it back?
* If you had to throw out all your clothes but keep one thing, what would you keep?
* If you were building up your wardrobe from nothing, what would you do differently this time?
* What’s the first “investment” item you bought? Do you still own or wear it?
* Was there ever an important or paradigm shifting purchase in your life?
* What item or clothing are you still (or have you forever been) on the hunt for?
* Do you remember the biggest waste of money you ever made on an item of clothing?
* Was there a point in your life when your style changed dramatically? What happened?
* Do you address anything political in the way you dress?
* Did you ever buy an article of clothing without giving it much thought, only to have it prove much more valuable as time went on? What was the item, and what happened?
* Did you ever buy an item of clothing or jewelry certain that it would be meaningful to you, but it wasn’t at all? What was it, and what happened?
* How and when do you shop for clothes?
* Do you have any shopping rules you follow?
* How does how you dress play into your ambitions for yourself?
* How does money fit into all this?
* Are there any clothing (or related) items that you have in multiple? Why do you think you keep buying this thing?
* Is there an article of clothing, some makeup, or an accessory that you carry with you or wear every day?
* Can you recall some times when you have dressed a particular way to calm yourself or gain a sense of control over a situation that scared you?
* Do you remember the first time you were conscious of what you were wearing? Can you describe this moment and what it was about?
* Did anyone ever say anything to you that made you see yourself differently, on a physical and especially sartorial level?
* In what way is this stuff important, if at all?

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Review: “The True Cost” of Fast-fashion

Posted by on August 23, 2015

I watched “The True Cost” this weekend after a recommendation from a fashion industry leader who wants to leave her job. It was a documentary on a topic I’ve grown to know a lot about as it also intersects with globalism, sustainabiity, and economics. “The True Cost” is a transparent reminder of the fast-fashion industry’s collective damage and toll on humanity and the earth. It was difficult to emotionally process, especially since I have also participated in this cycle, whether purchasing clothes from H&M or Forever21 once upon time until I learned how to make my own clothes. My friends who pride themselves on being eco-friendly and compost diligently every week still purchase clothes for bargain prices and throw away shoes after a visit to Las Vegas just because “the shoes are so cheap.” We should be with the life cycle of a garment from where it starts to where it ends.

Slavery still exists, and a lot of these factories overseas are treating their workers like cattle. Clothing factory workers in India and Bangladesh make $10/month on average. The whole system is a vicious cycle. There is the counterargument that we are helping build the infrastructure of these third-world countries from essentially nothing, but that doesn’t justify how harmful and dehumanizing these conditions are as well as the social impact they are having on our planet. We all live on Earth. We all wear clothes. Clothes matter.

I’ve heard anecdotes about people in first-world countries who leave their jobs the day they walk in. Their quitting is reasonable since the situation was that bad: the employer was exploitative, the working condition was highly questionable, etc. But what about laborers who have no choice? Privilege exists along a continuum and as people who are empowered to choose the jobs they want, we should also examine the clothing we purchase and why the $ sign can be so low. If the cost is that low, then that means the company made a huge profit off of exploiting their factory workers. Not to mention, the quality of the materials was also sacrificed to produce such a high volume of clothing quickly and cheaply. Earth is not respected as land and a gift we should thoughtfully cherish; to the corporations the Earth has become a factory to abuse and reap benefits from at its expense.

As a consumer, you have power. You don’t have to enable this cycle and buy into this cycle of mass production, consumption, blood, and disposal.

Did you know that IGIGI makes all of its clothing in San Francisco? I’m very proud to work for a brand that gives back to its local economy and pays its workers a living wage in ethical work conditions. An IGIGI purchase is an investment because the clothes are built to last. Stand behind your clothing and the hands it took to make them. Know the true price.

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